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Evelyn and Harold Duoos trying out their new Buccaneer motor on Lake Minnewawa in 1940.
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Whatever became of Grassy Portage?

A cozy tradition on Lake Minnewawa
Jim Hawley • Contributing writer,
October 21, 2014
 

MCGREGOR, Minn.—Out on Sheshebe Point stands a cabin that was acquired in 1924, and retains its rustic charm almost 100 years later.

John Braaten and Brita Alsaker came to the United States separately as young adults from Norway. They met at a Norwegian picnic in Minneapolis, were married in 1913, settled in south Minneapolis and raised a family of four girls. John operated a tailor shop while Brita stayed at home to raise their children.

On a tip from a dairy deliveryman, whose parents owned a resort with cabins in northern Minnesota, the Braatens decided to visit the resort, “Shady Rest.” Daughter, Evelyn recalled in her memoir that the resort was owned by Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Wallace.

About a year later, in 1924, John and Brita acquired a cabin about a mile from the resort. Evelyn remembered it as a “bare bones” cabin. “Nothing finished in the interior, no electricity, so kerosene lamps and a wood stove were our sources of energy. We had a hand pump a few feet from the back door and of course ‘a path to the bath.’”

Evelyn was the third of the four girls. She recalled the daylong trip to the lake in their Model T. The family ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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feature photo
Recent Features

Smiling down on her

Freshwater Jellyfish found in Round Lake

Seeking a third World Championship

Twins,locals build new ball field

Johnston family operates creamery near Floodwood

Another resort from Big Sandy's past ... Isle View

Entertainment for the entire family

We've grown with the trees

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Sobriety run ...

"Every day is a gift
Jim Hawley • Contributing writer,
October 14, 2014
 

So spoke four-year breast cancer survivor, Barb Schouweiler. Barb graciously sat down over coffee to share her experience as part of the Voyageur Press’ October observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Barb was born in St. Paul, raised in Oakdale, moved to Colorado, and returned to Minnesota about a year and a-half ago. Her mom and step-dad retired to the McGregor area in the late ’90s, and when her step-dad passed away, with three children now on their own, Barb decided to move to be with her mom, Darlene. These geographic journeys, though, pale in comparison to the one she began in the summer of 2010.

Barb’s maternal grandmother passed away from breast cancer when Darlene was eight years old, so there was a hereditary health risk. Darlene, though, has been blessed with good health. Barb had a baseline mammogram at age 35 and, aware of her risk profile, regular examinations after that which were clean. Breast cancer was “nothing we really thought of,” said Barb.

In that summer of 2010, Barb heard those words you don’t want to hear after her regular check-up – “We would like you to come back for more images.” Those additional images resulted in the call for an ultrasound, which showed markings clear “even to my (Barb’s) untrained eye.” Next came a core needle biopsy. “It sounded like a nail gun,” Barb recalled. The diagnosis ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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feature photo
Recent Features

Freshwater Jellyfish found in Round Lake

Seeking a third World Championship

Twins,locals build new ball field

Johnston family operates creamery near Floodwood

Another resort from Big Sandy's past ... Isle View

Entertainment for the entire family

We've grown with the trees

Whatever became of Grassy Portage?

Sobriety run ...

Mother Nature asserts her power - and takes ours

Smiling down on her
John Grones • Publisher, October 7, 2014
 

Pam Binder went in for her yearly physical and mammogram on Oct. 28, 2013, and was called back in a few days later for more imaging. Pam was informed that some shady or dark areas were showing up.

On November 5, the discouraging news came back and Pam was informed that she had breast cancer. Pam would turn to her faith, her husband and a special friend.

Pam’s first thought when she heard the news, “‘Well God, this is in Your hands.’ Then I called my husband (Jeff).”

Pam is currently a 10-month survivor after enduring a bilateral mastectomy that saved her life.
Looking back, Pam recalls each and every step of the 10-month process and all the tough decisions that accompany them.

The return visit for a second examination, for what the professionals termed “shady areas,” is not all that pleasant to remember, but so important in fighting cancer. Pam recalled not being all that alarmed since this had happened in the past. “I was not worried,” shared Pam. “When the nurse finished taking several pictures, she asked me to wait while they were checked. ‘No problem— been there, done this.’ When she came back and said that a few more were needed, I got a ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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