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Maddy Street: The traditional celebrations— Wild Rice Days and the Lions Corn Feed— are held each Labor Day Weekend.

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Entertainment for the entire family
McGregor, Minn., August 26, 2014
 

McGREGOR, Minn.—Labor Day weekend marks the end of summer vacation for the children. It is also a weekend of celebration in McGregor. People from all over the region will visit McGregor and enjoy Wild Rice Days and the Lions Corn Feed.

For many years, the event has featured a fun walk/run, car show, parade, medallion hunt and serveral vendors offering a variety of crafts and food.

New to Wild Rice Days is the Frozen t-Shirt contest added last year.

This year, additional entertainment, sponsored by the McGregor Area Chamber of Commerce, includes duo, “Vocal Perspectives,” comprised of Laurie Antonson and Wayne Leeds; Caught in the Act, a juggling act by Mark and Ben; and local rock band, Finding Blakesley.
Local organization ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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Beach Time: Fiona grabs a pail and is ready for some beach time on Prairie Lake

Recent Features

Whatever became of Grassy Portage?

Sobriety run ...

Mother Nature asserts her power - and takes ours

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Everyone enjoys the Fair

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New Bridge coming to Brookston

Unbridled joy & diligence

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Fishing Tournament

We’ve grown with the trees
JOHN GRONES Publisher, August 19, 2014
 

PRAIRIE LAKE—Memories at the lake go way back for the Collman family. In fact, the Collmans will be celebrating 100 years on Prairie Lake in a couple of years.

The history of the homestead dates back to 1916 when Richard Collman’s grandfather, Henry purchased the property on Prairie Lake. It was later, in 1938, that Richard’s father, Forrest came to homestead the property. “The agreement was that if my father came to homestead the property, he would inherit the land,” said Richard. “So, in 1938 my father piled everthing into a car and a truck and moved to Prairie Lake from Southwest Iowa.”

The depression contributed to the move, but Richard also noted that his father liked to hunt and fish.

Forrest and his wife, Doris, had two children, Arnold and Richard. Forrest first got a job at the Prairie Lake School. “It really was a great opportunity,” noted Richard. “The teacherage was upstairs, grades 1-8 below that and the gym downstairs.

The school did not ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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Grassy Portage: A photo of the island at the time of Fred Smith's purchase, with the area known as Grassy Portage highlighted in green and the bridge crossing at upper left.

Recent Features

Sobriety run ...

Mother Nature asserts her power - and takes ours

Honor Fight Northland #7

Everyone enjoys the Fair

Celebrating the 4th of July

New Bridge coming to Brookston

Unbridled joy & diligence

Growing together

Fishing Tournament

Logging in their blood

Whatever became of Grassy Portage?
Jim Hawley Contributing Writer. August 12, 2014
 

BIG SANDY LAKE—There was once an area on Big Sandy Lake known as Grassy Portage. It was an area that was farmed on a large island. What happened to it? Fred Smith happened to it.

That name sound familiar? It might, as the founder of FEDEX was Fred Smith. But he’s not the one we’re talking about.

The Fred Smith we’re talking about grew up in Minneapolis and attended Dunwoody Institute for training in carpentry. He met and married a young woman named Betty, whose family had built a cabin on Big Sandy Lake down the shoreline from Hillcrest Resort around 1930. Per son Ron Smith, “Mom grew up with summers at the lake.”

After they were married, Fred and his father-in-law, Floyd Dail, built a larger log cabin on the site that is still standing today. Fred was still working in Minneapolis, but was chagrinned about the lack of time to pursue his passion for outdoor activities. In 1946 he saw an opportunity to scratch his outdoors, and also an entrepreneurial, itch. Fred quit his job, and he and Betty acquired Miller’s Resort on Big Sandy ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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