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Generally Speaking – Columns

Generally Speaking is the Voyageur's forum for columns, cartoons, and letters to the editor. Skeeter Tales by Joel Seibel is our very own locally produced cartoon. Columns include "Wright News" by Jennie K. Hanson, "Villa Vista News" by Renee Klejeski and "Slices of Life" by Jill Pertler. Views expressed in columns, cartoons, and letters represent the views of the authors.

 

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Other Columns

Nothing good comes from dusting

Electromagnetic-pulse (EMP) attack

Excuse us; we're having a moment

Flipping the Switch

Shamrock Township "on the map"

Relationships - reality?

Political Bargains

Too big to fail

Minimum Wage vs. Unemployment

A little Blarney for all

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

“Are we being good ancestors?”

The question above was posed by Dr. Jonas Salk, medical researcher and developer of the first successful polio vaccine. I ran across that question in a book I have been reading, How We Got to Now, by Steven Johnson (Riverhead Books, 2014) the evening following two days of interviewing area graduating high school seniors.

Talking with those young people was energizing. They were engaging, mature, and comfortable talking to an old guy. They left me feeling good that there are some good young folks who will be picking up and carrying the ball, if you will, that we can rely on.

But then I read Salk’s question.

We are at that solemn time of year where we remember those who gave their lives to build and preserve our country, culminating in Memorial Day ceremonies and activities. Then, days later, we celebrate graduations and the launch of high school and college graduates into their new worlds with optimism and excitement about their possibilities. As they continue in their lives and careers, what will they inherit from us?

As Dr. Salk continued, “… what will it take for our descendants to look back at our ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

Electromagnetic-pulse (EMP) attack

Excuse us; we're having a moment

Flipping the Switch

Shamrock Township "on the map"

Relationships - reality?

Political Bargains

Too big to fail

Minimum Wage vs. Unemployment

A little Blarney for all

The veto of the Keystone Pipeline

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

Nothing good comes from dusting

Arriving home a couple Mondays ago, I walked in to see my bride looking frustrated, the satellite TV manual open on a chair … and … our TV screen displaying snow. With Judy leaving the next day for three days, my first thoughts were around what sporting events and season finales was I going to miss over the diagnostic and repair period. Electronics diagnostic and repair is not in my wheelhouse of expertise.

What happened? My bride moved the TV in order to dust. If we have a greater nemesis in our cabin than dust, I’m not sure what it is. We could get up in the morning – “Good morning, how did you sleep?” “Fine, did you dust yet?”

Our house is a dust magnet. Granted, we live on a gravel road, but traffic is sparse. We will soon get our annual calcium chloride treatment, but that actually doesn’t seem to provide the expected level of internal relief.

One of my clients, back in the CPA firm days at the beginning of my career, was a foundry in western Minnesota. The office was separated from the plant by a door. I learned early on that I needed to cover anything valuable lest I leave the desk for a brief period and return to find a film covering said valuable – cup of coffee (the worst occurrence, by far), workpapers, briefcase ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

Excuse us; we're having a moment

Flipping the Switch

Shamrock Township "on the map"

Relationships - reality?

Political Bargains

Too big to fail

Minimum Wage vs. Unemployment

A little Blarney for all

The veto of the Keystone Pipeline

I've gone Gaga

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

Electromagnetic-pulse (EMP) attack

First of all, just what is an electromagnetic-pulse attack? An electromagnetic-pulse (EMP) attack would disable the electrical grid by the detonation of a nuclear weapon in space.

What would an electromagnetic-pulse attack do if such a weapon were detonated above the United States? It would be an unconceivable disaster, destroying all unprotected military and civilian electronics nationwide for months, maybe years to come. Imagine life without electricity, in a world where we depend on electricity in almost everything we do. Without electricity we would soon be without our basic needs for survival.

On April 7 of this year, the Pentagon started moving the North American Aerospace Defense Command (Norad) back into Cheyenne Mountain near Colorado Springs, Colorado. During the cold war Cheyenne Mountain was hollowed-out and built to survive a nuclear attack and resist an electromagnetic-pulse attack. The facility had been vacated a decade ago.

Norad Commander Adm. William Gortney noted that Norad is going back underground because of the very nature of the way that Cheyenne Mountain is built. It’s EMP hardened.” Adm. Gortney went on to explain that North Korea now has mobile intercontinental ballistic ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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