Subscribe|Advertise|Contact Us|Order Photos

Generally Speaking – Columns

Generally Speaking is the Voyageur's forum for columns, cartoons, and letters to the editor. Skeeter Tales by Joel Seibel is our very own locally produced cartoon. Columns include "Wright News" by Jennie K. Hanson, "Villa Vista News" by Renee Klejeski and "Slices of Life" by Jill Pertler. Views expressed in columns, cartoons, and letters represent the views of the authors.

 

news photo
Other Columns

Will the United Kingdom remain United

An election season interpretive resource

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

The pendulum has swung

The clothes ... make the man, or do they?

All thumbs

Redistribution recession

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

The War on Poverty

This year marks the 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s launching the war on poverty. President Johnson’s intention was that the War on Poverty would reduce federal spending on welfare and transform poor people from “Taxeaters” into “Taxpayers.”

In 1949 the poverty rate in the United States was estimated at 34 percent. By 1964, when the “War on Poverty” was declared, the poverty rate in the United States had been in a freefall for 14 years and was estimated at 19 percent. The poverty continued to drop until reaching 14 percent in 1967.

Since 1967 the United States poverty rate has wavered between 12 and 15 percent. Twice the poverty rate has dropped to the 12 percent figure, in 1973 and again in 1999. In 1983, 1994, 2012 and 2013 the poverty rate pushed above the 14 percent mark. To make a long story short there have been no dramatic shifts in the United States level of poverty since 1967.

The living conditions of people in poverty have improved greatly over the years. The word “poverty” no longer means being denied material things. According to government surveys, families identified as poor have air conditioning, cable or satellite TV, and a computer in the home. Forty percent ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

An election season interpretive resource

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

The pendulum has swung

The clothes ... make the man, or do they?

All thumbs

Redistribution recession

The kids outshine us again

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

Will the United Kingdom
remain United

On the 18th of September, just two days from now, Scotland will vote on a referendum to secede from the United Kingdom. Like in most elections there are two catchy phrases used by the opposing sides; “Better Together” and “Yes, Scotland”.
The latest poles, that I could glean, show the “Better Together” at 39%, the “Yes Scotland” at 38% and the undecided at 23%. The future of the United Kingdom today, is an unknown.

The Irony of this vote is that this political union, that was formed 307 years ago, could split a united country in a single referendum. A United Kingdom that once ruled 1/3 of the planet’s surface would be reduced to three minor European states. (England, Wales and Northern Ireland) In my lifetime, 73 years and counting, I have seen the United Kingdom give independence to almost all the world it once controlled.

The real difference is the areas like Australia, South Africa and Kenya never held seats in the English Parliament or were “owners” of the assets of the United Kingdom. If this referendum passes it is going to be much more like a divorce, than a colony being free to form its own government.

How does a country divide its assets? How will government property be divided? Then there are the off shore mineral rights and the North Sea oil issues that would have ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

The pendulum has swung

The clothes ... make the man, or do they?

All thumbs

Redistribution recession

The kids outshine us again

Youth unemployment

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

An election season interpretive resource From nutrition to grammar

With the arrival of Labor Day, the experts now proclaim we are in the fall election season for real. So, I thought it would be well to develop a guide to assist us through the process as candidates (for election/re-election) make their appeals to us.

“Eating fish is good for you.” We’ve all heard that, and should get ready. There will be an ample supply of herrings offered us during election season, most of them red. Healthyeating.com tells us that herring and sardines are very similar, and good sources of vitamin D and zinc – but I suggest sticking with sardines as they have four times the amount of calcium versus herring. Also, in order to be colored red, I’m certain that a red herring must be processed with some sort of dye that would not be good for us to consume.

Experienced fish mongers will also introduce faux emotion via raising a scenario distantly related to the issue specifically under discussion.

“We just need to do the right thing.” There will be candidates who present “moral arguments.” This, of course, means that ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

__________
__________
__________
Gilby's Nursery and Orchard

Cinnie Smith link Advertise online! Advertise online! Advertise online! Advertise online!