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Generally Speaking – Columns

Generally Speaking is the Voyageur's forum for columns, cartoons, and letters to the editor. Skeeter Tales by Joel Seibel is our very own locally produced cartoon. Columns include "Wright News" by Jennie K. Hanson, "Villa Vista News" by Renee Klejeski and "Slices of Life" by Jill Pertler. Views expressed in columns, cartoons, and letters represent the views of the authors.

 

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Other Columns

They said what?

The day they tried corn

Living quiet in a noisy world

The War on Poverty

Will the United Kingdom remain United

An election season interpretive resource

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

Is Everlasting Peace an option?

The First World War was the war to end all wars. That belief left the United States unprepared for another war and laid the ground work for the Second World War.

After WW I the victors went home to enjoy the peace they had earned. Armies were cut back and what was happening in Germany, Italy and Japan was ignored. When the German Army overran countries that were German speaking and Italy moved into Ethiopia there was little action by the League of Nations. The League of Nations did nothing when Japan invaded China.

British Prime Minister Chamberlin signed a nonaggression treaty with Hitler and declared “Peace with Honor.” Churchill spoke out against the treaty saying, “not only will we not have peace, you have signed away your honor.” Britain did build its military.

As the war spread across Europe, the people of the United States wanted no part of another war. President Roosevelt, realizing that the United States may be drawn into the developing war, appointed Bill Knudsen to develop a plan to prepare the United States industrial might for war. (Read “Freedoms Forge” by Author Herman.)

Going to war was not something the people in the United States wanted. However, the Japanese made that decision for us by bombing Pearl ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

The day they tried corn

Living quiet in a noisy world

The War on Poverty

Will the United Kingdom remain United

An election season interpretive resource

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

The pendulum has swung

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

They said what?

Those of you who read the Voyageur Press know I end my stories and columns with a quote. I enjoy collecting quotes, and have accumulated quite a number of them. Instead of ending this column with a quote, I thought I’d feature a few quotes I haven’t used yet in stories and columns and make them the focal point of this column. I have two hopes: 1) That you will find some of the quotes thought provoking, and 2) I don’t use a quote that would be a natural fit for a soon-to-be written piece.

Try these two competing thoughts on for size. “Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must first be overcome” (Samuel Johnson, British author); “Beware of the man who won’t be bothered with details” (William Feather, American publisher). I once heard from a mentor that life is lived “at the intersection.” To me, that is reflected in these two quotes, and is instructional as to how things get done. I can’t help but think of today’s confrontational, and often ineffective, political environment.

“Defeat is not the worst of failures. Not to have tried is the true failure” (George Woodberry, American literary critic and poet); “Being defeated is a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent” (Marilyn vos Savant, American columnist). First, who could argue ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

Living quiet in a noisy world

The War on Poverty

Will the United Kingdom remain United

An election season interpretive resource

Advice on the first day

Sandpiper approval process - live or "Memorex"?

August you're tough to love

Thank you to Robyn Larson and Gerry Aho

The pendulum has swung

The clothes ... make the man, or do they?

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

The day they tried corn

It was a serious day in the garden. Various vegetables gathered to witness the much-anticipated criminal fraud case against corn. Corn had filed a countersuit claiming defamation of character and vegetative discrimination. These historic proceedings would hopefully answer the question that had plagued the human and plant kingdoms since the dawn of time: Is corn a grain or vegetable?

Corn entered the courthouse amid chants of, “Grain, grain, grain,” from the other vegetables in attendance. Broccoli and cauliflower threw quinoa at him.

The bailiff, a head of iceberg, entered and asked everyone to be seated. “Let us start this mess,” he said.

In opening arguments, corn, who represented himself, argued that although technically a grain by standard definition, he deserved the title of vegetable based on his longstanding position next to mashed potatoes on the dinner plate. “Everyone knows you only include one starch with a meal,” he said. “That makes me the vegetable by default.”

The rest of the vegetables, not possessing a grain of intelligence of their own, called an expert witness to the stand. Dr. Bunsen Honeydew, of Muppet fame, testified under oath that corn has been associated with politically incorrect terms. “Words like high fructose, saturated fat and processed food products are not language worthy of vegetables,” ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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