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Generally Speaking – Columns

Generally Speaking is the Voyageur's forum for columns, cartoons, and letters to the editor. Skeeter Tales by Joel Seibel is our very own locally produced cartoon. Columns include "Wright News" by Jennie K. Hanson, "Villa Vista News" by Renee Klejeski and "Slices of Life" by Jill Pertler. Views expressed in columns, cartoons, and letters represent the views of the authors.

 

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Other Columns

All thumbs

Redistribution recession

The kids outshine us again

Youth unemployment

A watched pot

Midterm elections

Nature was ready, we mostly were

The day of Doug

Half-empty Nester

Carolinas on our minds

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

The clothes ...make the man, or do they?

Mark Twain was said to have observed, “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” Okay, I am willing to go with that. I hope it remains true, lest political campaigns become really unpleasant.

I started down this sartorial road when I read that the Lone Ranger’s outfit recently sold to a collector for $195,000. The previous owner had acquired it about ten years ago for $100,000. About a seven percent annual average return for the ten-year period – not too bad in today’s environment.

It seems like many real or fictional men could be noted for their wardrobe. There are some interesting oddities, though. Take a couple western heroes who wore the same clothes every episode. I get, for example, why Matt Dillon wore the same clothes all the time. Typically, one doesn’t pursue a career in law enforcement for the money. But, I don’t understand Ben Cartwright. The Ponderosa looked like it represented about half of the current state of Nevada. You’d think Ben could have popped for another vest, or two, along ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

Redistribution recession

The kids outshine us again

Youth unemployment

A watched pot

Midterm elections

Nature was ready, we mostly were

The day of Doug

Half-empty Nester

Carolinas on our minds

Special spring times in Cromwell and Wright

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

All thumbs

When I was in school – and dinosaurs roamed the earth – everyone took a class called typewriting 101. We wrote about the quick brown fox and lazy dog using our eight fingers without hardly any effort from our thumbs. My right thumb was responsible for only one button – the space bar. My left thumb had the day off.

Today kids learn keyboarding and have probably never laid eyes on a typewriter, but the bulk of their typing isn’t done on either and typically involves nearly zero finger participation. That’s because the hipsters among us don’t type anymore; we text. And most pro-texters rely solely on the nimbleness and agility of their thumbs to get their messages across.

They are good at it. Thumb texters demonstrate dexterity and speed. They can fire off messages in just a few seconds. One lucky guy even has a place in the Guinness Book of World Records for being the fastest texter on the planet. My son competently and confidently texts while holding his phone in his pocket (with his eyes closed). True talents run ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

news photo
Other Columns

The kids outshine us again

Youth unemployment

A watched pot

Midterm elections

Nature was ready, we mostly were

The day of Doug

Half-empty Nester

Carolinas on our minds

Special spring times in Cromwell and Wright

Living-room hockey

» Jennie Hanson's Wright/Cromwell News – online

Redistribution recession

The redistribution recession is the recession that started in 2009 and laid the ground work for the slowest recession recovery since the Great Depression. Sound confusing? The explanation is rather simple, it all starts with an administration and a Congress that do not understand basic human nature.

Maybe I should say it all starts with an administration and a Congress that are more interested in being reelected than they are in sound economic governing.

The simple answer is: the more the government helps unemployed people, the more unemployed people there are to help. Helping some of the people some of the time is a necessity, but helping so many people, all the time, is not only something the government cannot afford, it is counterproductive.

Since 2009 unemployment benefits were extended several times for the long-term unemployed. A program that is now ending, or so the government tells us. Look at the food stamp program, it now has a new name and replaced the stamps with debit cards, and is now free food with very few ...

For the rest of this story and more, pick up this week's Voyageur Press.

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